PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 5

PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 5

| Mugler |

David Koma paid direct tribute to the house founder in this urban, contemporary spin on the Thierry Mugler power-dressing legacy. There was also a bit of stargazing. “Deconstructed constellations” is how Koma described the jagged star constructions that blazed across dresses like lightning bolts or surfaced as cutouts on the hems of minis, in nods to the iconic star motif of the house’s Angel fragrance. Shine came from the pleated lamé dresses in signature cobalt blue, a story line from the archive that fell a little flat on the asymmetric panel dresses and tops with pleated lamé inserts.
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| Acne Studio |

“I didn’t want to go urban or streetwear or sporty in any way.” - Jonny Johansson. He moved in the opposite direction, pursuing the feminine, romantic, a bit naïve, but not without the arty, oddball edge that is the essence of the brand. It was nice to see a soft side of Acne.
The collection was full of deconstruction and primitive raw stitching and patchworking on bias-cut dresses that looked crafted from worn muslin. A sheer black dress with a fold-down collar was stitched with a red patch of fabric trailing with threads and was sewn with a flowing diagonal panel of checked fabric. Silhouettes conjured a modernist 20's / 30's mood with long lean dresses and mannish tailored coats. Johansson wanted the look to be grown up, nothing too young.
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| Elie Saab |

Elie Saab said his fall collection was inspired by “Giselle,” though he flitted around the theme with a display of moody glamour. Saab, worked a somber palette of deep purple, ink black and royal blue with a sprinkling of a pale-pink shade that his show notes fancifully referred to as “whisper-light sugar, as if from a maiden’s blushed cheek.”

The dancer-inspired silhouettes were most evident on corseted dresses with velvet ribbon details or laced backs. These included an upscale purple dirndl with horizontal lace insets, as well as a vampy purple lace maxi gown where the velvet ribbons framed a bare neckline. Tutus inspired sheer, embroidered or lace skater skirts, while lilies were also a recurring motif. They were traced in gold studs on a leather biker jacket, and formed an appliqué pattern in black velvet outlined with gold sequins on sheer black tulle
The delicate designs contrasted with demonstrative outerwear, including velvet demi-capes that hung off one shoulder and coats with extravagant fur collars and cuffs. Crystal-studded tights and furry open-toed ankle boots completed the look.
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| Vivienne Westwood |

Going back to his roots, Andreas Kronthaler filtered the house’s absurdist punk heritage through an Austrian storyline hooked.  A voluminous black hooded cape dress covered in fiery motifs added drama. “They were so inspired by Africa in those days. There were traveling exhibitions and Klimt went to one in Vienna in the late 19th century, and that’s where all these spirals and triangles and squares came from, because they were using that in their jewelry and fabrics, or whatever.” - Kronthaler
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| Comme Des Garcons |

Only a fool would dare call Rei Kawakubo formulaic. But there are certain things one can expect from her runway shows. For fall it was, “The future of silhouette.” Another thing that has been consistent, especially lately, is that the runway is less a platform for “clothes”, even clothes by Kawakubo’s standard. Candy for the eye, food for the fashion brain.

The first thought that came to mind when the opening look — a fuzzy white sculpted form with Picasso-esque curves at the bust and backside, but no armholes. Then another similar look came out, both creatures wearing Nikes with black bows on them and curly wigs that looked like steel wool. The models made eye contact, gave each other knowing looks and meandered around the runway like a pair of discombobulated twins who had just wandered into a different dimension and were having a look-see.
According to Kawakubo, the silhouettes of the future will be made from fabrics both humble and fancy. Each time, a single model went first, at times looking over her shoulder as if a friend was lagging behind. They watched each other, sized each other up, whether out of familiarity, competition or suspicion, it was unclear. In the future, silhouettes communicate.
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| Nina Ricci |

“It’s fashion. It’s joy. It’s fun,” Guillaume Henry
Henry imagined a world in which women choose to dress in a feminine manner, with equal parts grace and bravado. And if they occasionally embrace unbridled glitz, so be it. He thus worked his Western fantasies with control, balancing understatement and overstatement in an upbeat collection that radiated a kind of chic that doesn’t take itself too seriously. The Nina Ricci woman neither ponders fashion nor obsesses over it. She enjoys it.
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| Sonia Rykiel |

Sonia Rykiel remains the eternal muse at the house that bears her name, but she doesn’t have to be the only strong, independent-woman source of inspiration. She referred to clothes as canvases, working with classics based on house DNA — gypsy dresses, knits, suits, trenches and stripes — mostly in black, white and navy and building them up in proportion and embellishment.

The show opened with a belted white dress in what looked like sturdy linen with exaggerated sleeves and curving vertical ruffles, romantic but clean in its construction. The same could be said for gypsy dresses in navy and khaki with high necklines, blouson sleeves and tassels and red and navy trim: They had a nice balance of exuberance and sobriety. Signature tweeds were rendered in thick patchworks, such as on the skirt worn with a red cable knit sweater that fell into a graceful peplum. The colorful threads from the tweeds were reprised as crafty floral embroidery on a black satin peasant dress.
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| Rahul Mishra |

Art was the inspiration behind Rahul Mishra Fall 2017 collection is namely the work of French Neo-Impressionist painter Paul Signac who helped to develop pointillism. That influence rendered itself in landscape-embroidered knits, bombers, and ball gowns, and feather embellishment layered over stripes.
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| Junya Watanabe |

Didn’t Junya Watanabe do punk last season? Yes, he did, with a Berlin streetwear slant. For fall, he let his anarchy flow from the source: London. His punks were dressed in electric yellow and red plaids that were patchworked with black leather, sequins, traditional tailoring fabrics, a host of floral and jacquard upholstery plus leopard prints done the classic way and in red and purple. Everything was collaged: amorphous capes and dresses crafted from circles and pointy triangles, some fused with moto jackets, many worn over pleated kilts and layered with fishnet sleeves and tights.
“Watanabe created his first collection from materials found at flea markets in London, stripping away sofas, pulling away curtains and cutting up tweed coats.” His techniques, construction, eye for color and shape are the best of the genre, bar-none.
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| Haider Ackermann |

Haider Ackermann is not feeling for overstatement these days. “I just really wanted something quiet and silent,” - Ackermann.
His visual stood in opposition to last season’s vibrant birds of paradise collection. Though he’s one of the most skilled colorists working in fashion today, he stuck almost exclusively to a palette of black and white, some pieces marked with a single, imperfect line of golden yellow. His only other color digression: rare shots of electric blue.

Typically, Ackermann integrates precision tailoring with fluidity, sometimes in graceful dresses and robes, and others, more complicated appendages that ebb and flow with the women’s movement.
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PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 6

PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 6

PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 4

PFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 4