NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 5

NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 5

| Philipp Plein |

No matter the city, no matter the location, a Philipp Plein show is always an experience, often one that tries the patience of attending editors. For his New York Fashion Week debut, the German-born designer chose Fifth Avenue’s New York Public Library as the venue for his fall runway show.
The collection included everything you can expect from the label, super expensive materials crafted into silhouettes ranging from street-cool to sexy decorated with flamboyant details. Most of the looks were developed in both men’s and women’s versions.

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| Carolina Herrera |

In December, Carolina Herrera Ltd. sued Oscar de la Renta for the stated purpose of enforcing a non-compete clause that would have prevented Kim from returning to her former employer for a few months. Herrera has embraced a younger direction, toning down her grander statements in terms of design. A smart, funnel neck coat in teal wool had a velvet bow on each hip; a sportswear moment layered a burgundy sweater and white shirt over fluid skirt.

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| Zimmermann |

It appears that even the most feminine of brands isn’t immune to the reality of gender-unifying dressing, a trend seen across many shows this season. Zimmermann has a historical penchant of leaning toward the feminine frills of bohemia and elaborate occasionwear. Fall was tougher, in both attitude and fabrications, pulsating with a boyish sensibility that resulted in clothes with more wear potential. Feminine embellishments were intermixed with the tough, like the sheer lace dresses underneath outerwear, swishy skirt tales, lingerie-inspired underpinnings and flashy sequins.

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| Proenza Schouler |

It was such a blow to New York-based industry insiders when designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez announced that they will be breaking away from the traditional ready-to-wear calendar starting with their spring 2018 collection and, at least for the time being, moving their show to Paris. 
Brand signatures like slashed dresses, asymmetrical hems, funky layering, body-hugging wrap details, knife-pleated skirts and super-luxe coats lined with shearling were in large supply. The accessories were made for city life, too: handbags were oversize and mixed-material, and pointed-toe flats were paired with most of the looks. The eveningwear had a sporty edge, thanks to mesh paneling, abstract stripes and cutouts; while they might prove to be a little adventurous for some shoppers, we could see any number of the brand's devoted fans.

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| Zadig & Voltaire |

For her fall collection, Zadig & Voltaire artistic director Cecilia Bönström portrayed a Parisian girl transported to downtown New York. The brand’s French roots were reflected in many of the silhouettes, including the skintight leather biker pants paired with sweaters with graphic intarsia. Then the mood veered towards urban cool, with oversize logo sweaters and hoodies worn as minidresses and fluid suits, including a black one layered under a silk satin bomber jacket that had a tomboy vibe.
Bönström also delivered thick, knitted pieces, such a coat and a pair of baggy pants, all worked in a macro leopard pattern. More openly feminine designs included flowing silk dresses worn over trousers. Though a few pieces looked a tad out of place, such as a Chinese-inspired frock embellished with the name “Voltaire,” the lineup offered plenty of wearable options for urban girls.

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| 3.1 Phillip Lim |

It’s happening. The political climate is front and center on the runways this season, with some designers making their version of a message of inclusion, diversity and the American dream more visually obviously than others. Phillip Lim was among those reacting to current events on a sly, thoughtful level. “The part we play is to empower through what we do, and that’s the use of clothes. I worked on the idea of new romantics, color, curiosity and courage, and making clothes that women want.” - Phillip Lim

To his point, the show was full of softness and ideas that tied back to traditional femininity. The magenta and orange set bathed the collection in rosy light, and the show opened with a pink fuzzy tailored coat belted with silver chain links and a black ribbon tied in a bow. Some of the best looks were airy midlength dresses and tops and skirts in black and white cut in off-kilter structural ruffles, kind of like modernist, deconstructed peasant looks, which were accented with organic-looking jewelry. Lim delivered romance with strength, drawing on very classic womanly notions with a series of leather bustier corset tops, which were quite surprising and daring from him, but also working with the now. 

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| Libertine |

Some things never change: for one, Johnson Hartig’s runway shows for Libertine are always a riotous good time. Hartig’s humor and elaborate use of embellishment carried through to the men’s wear as well. The over-the-top aesthetic worked best on a sweatshirt featuring a print that mixed images of Santa Claus smoking with Alexis Carrington Colby, the fictional “Dynasty” character, as well as on leopard-printed sweatpants and leggings.

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| Zero + Maria Cornejo |

There’s a surge this season among designers referencing “empowerment” as their inspiration. Maria Cornejo cites both ideas as being mirrored in her fall collection for Zero + Maria Cornejo. And she insists on adding “femininity” to the mix. The designer showed lots of lush shearling, as collars for long swirling coats or leather jackets; as shrugs and great wild curly haired jackets in camel or black, reversing to distressed leather. The loveliest addition to the soft side was beautiful, sensuous velvet in a shimmering palette of copper, black and red. Cornejo cut the luxe fabric in ruched bubble tops and a knockout column gown in red.

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| Oscar De La Renta |

Everything involves risk, even choices driven by pragmatism. The decision by Oscar de la Renta to show its own collection and Monse together, both now officially designed by Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia, was risky. It seemed a financial decision, and on that level made all the sense in the world. Money alone were the sole consideration behind a move as unconventional as back-to-back showings. Those involved in this decision must have talked through various scenarios. Best-case: two smash hits, distinctive in tone, but with high levels of allure. Other obvious possibilities: that the two collections would be too similar, or that one would look far better than the other. Bingo.
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NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 6

NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 6

NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 4

NYFW | Autumn Winter 17 | Day 4